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Why arent we?

Bodybuilding.com is a giant mess of a site stuck about 6 years in the past. It does have a lot of useful information if you are willing to wade through the mess of trolls and spam, this website has top information without the mess of a 'forum' style discussion board.

Also the visitors per day for this website seems to be falling, it has so much potential what can we do?

And by the way bodybuilding.com is not just about body building, like this site, it is about all areas of fitness and nutrition!

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    While I definitely agree we should be taking users away from them, I'm quite worried that our image towards other network users is that we only cater to body builders. The question should rather be: how can we attract more users in general?
    – Ivo Flipse
    Apr 13 '11 at 21:27
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Bodybuilding.com is a giant mess of a site stuck about 6 years in the past. It does have a lot of useful information if you are willing to wade through the mess of trolls and spam, this website has top information without the mess of a 'forum' style discussion board.

It's an existing community with established norms. They aren't going to magically all switch allegiances to another, unknown, community overnight.

The best you can do is gently let them know this community is here, and encourage the more progressive members of that community -- the ones fed up with the spam, trolling, and forum noise -- to gradually adopt this as their home.

Beyond that, the normal rules of site promotion apply:

First, a few stats.

(bear in mind it's only been 43 of 90 days, and we often let betas go on indefinitely if they are producing great content. Quality is, as they say, Job One.)

Also refer to Robert's post here:

https://writers.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/221/what-happens-now

But if that's TL;DR, in general help us grow your site!

  1. Share great questions and answers
    http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2010/09/announcer-booster-and-publicist-badges/

  2. Vote, vote, vote
    http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2010/10/vote-early-vote-often/
    https://fitness.stackexchange.com/users?tab=voters

  3. Love and reward your new users for being awesome!
    https://fitness.stackexchange.com/review
    https://fitness.stackexchange.com/users

  4. Try to attract experts to the site by helping them get answers, too:
    http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2011/04/helping-the-experts-get-answers/

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  • While it is an existing community, this is so much better I think serious users would switch if they knew about it. It should be like the myspace to facebook migration on a smaller scale! Thank you for answer jeff respect to you!
    – Moz
    Apr 14 '11 at 7:39
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    I wonder if the growth of a site is somewhat linked to their presence on the StackExchange list of hot questions. Skeptics for instance has a lot of linkbait titles, which draw a lot of attention. That attention in turn cause other questions to get attention and thus feature the hottest question list. I wonder how some new/small sites would do if their best questions got some love on that list as well. :\
    – Ivo Flipse
    Apr 14 '11 at 13:03
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Most bodybuilding message boards are more a form of entertainment than a source of information. People post supportive accolades with little substance and argumentative insults with the sole purpose of having a presence and becoming popular in the community.

Once the message board is driven by a community, they develop a store to create a profit center. The real purpose behind the message board is just to have a loyal community to drive customers to.

The fact that this site is not like the others is what drew my interest. Putting time and effort into well thought out answers to real questions just to have them pushed to the bottom of the page by people promoting their websites, products, services, and themselves is disappointing.

Message boards that are comprised primarily of people from the bodybuilding community have a unique problem. Some examples...

Bodybuilding is very competitive, and there is a mental game involved as well. People tend to only tell half truths about their training methods. Imagine a girl who looks fantastic after losing 30 pounds. She may post that all she did is cut out soft drinks and start running 3 times a week. Now imagine if you were preparing for the same competition she was and you've struggled to lose 10 pounds so far. That could be a discouraging thing to read of one of your potential competitors. These people contribute incorrect and misleading information.

There are judges who train competitors which is complete conflict of interest, but it is commonplace in the bodybuilding world. People will try to have a strong presence on a site just to talk themselves up and inflict an opinion of themselves on judges and those who run bodybuilding publications. These people only contribute shallow exclamations on forums.

One other dilemma with bodybuilding sites is that many competitors take drugs that are illegal, therefore very controversial. That automatically leads to misinformation, because even if someone is thorough with diet and exercise plans that they are using, they will not offer information about the drug regimen they are on. If they are upfront about drug use, they will face criticism from others. This conflict develops into a lot of arguments and muddies the site up.

My point is that I don't think it will serve this sites purpose to focus too much energy toward drawing users from bodybuilding sites. I would expect a slow growth if you want to attract good contributing members.

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  • Couldn't have phrased it any better @Natalie. And your participation on the site is much appreciated! :-)
    – Ivo Flipse
    Apr 28 '11 at 19:31
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Its a completely different site with completely different goals.

Their focus seems to be selling programs to make you look like a strong-man. And people go there to buy it.

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